.
.
Math Central - mathcentral.uregina.ca
Quandaries & Queries
Q & Q
. .
topic card  

Topic:

prime factorization

list of
topics
. .
start over

12 items are filed under this topic.
 
Page
1/1
Prime factorization in exponent form 2014-10-31
From Emma:
I need to find out how to make a prime factorization of 120 in exponential form.
Answered by Penny Nom.
Prime factorization 2014-02-06
From Kadeejah:
Write the prime factorization of 37 in exponential form
Answered by Penny Nom.
What is my number? 2009-09-18
From Hanna:
What is my number?
My number is a perfect square.
The only number in its prime factorization is 2.
My number is a factor of 32.
The sum of its digits is odd.

Answered by Penny Nom.
Exponential form 2009-08-31
From cecil:
what is the exponent form 564000?
Answered by Stephen La Rocque and Harley Weston.
The prime factorization of one billion 2008-11-02
From Alta:
The prime factorization of 1000 is 2 cubed times 5 cubed. How do you write the prime factorization of one billion using exponents?
Answered by Penny Nom.
Prime factorization 2008-10-19
From nick:
while im doing prime factorization for one number and it cant be divided 2,3 or five so what next?
Answered by Penny Nom.
The square root of (18*n*34) 2008-07-01
From Peter:
What is the least possible positive integer-value of n such that square root(18*n*34) is an integer?
Answered by Penny Nom.
The greatest common factor of two numbers 2006-07-16
From Fadwa:
What is the greatest common factor(GCF) of the following algebraic expressions? 1680 and 6048
Answered by Stephen La Rocque.
How many numbers are relatively prime with 250? 2006-04-19
From David:
How many positive integers less than or equal to 250 are relatively prime with 250?
Answered by Stephen La Rocque.
How many divisors does the number 138600 have? 2006-02-08
From Joe:
How many divisors does the number 138600 have?
Answered by Steve La Rocque and Penny Nom.
LCM 2005-12-12
From Alex:
what is the LCM of 210 and 54 and the LCM of 42 and 126
Answered by Penny Nom.
Primes and square roots 2001-06-14
From Paul:
I have a bit of a math problem. It has to do with determining if a very large number is a prime. One method entails dividing the number by every smaller prime number. If any divide into it, it's not a prime. This would be a big job if the number was something like 400 digits long. Another way I read about was to take the square root of the number and test all the primes less than its square root. The explanation went like this: "When a number is divided by another number that is greater than its square root, the result is a number smaller than the square root. For example, the square root of 36 is 6. Dividing 36 by 2, a smaller number than 6, gives 18, a number that is larger than the square root. To prove that 37 is prime it is only necessary to divide it by primes less than 6, since if it had a prime factor greater than 6, it would have to have one less than 6 as well."

I understand the explanation, up to the last sentence. I fail to see the underlying logic. Why if a prime factor exists below the square does one have to exist above the square too? The number 40 can be divided by the prime 2, a number below its square root, but no other primes can do this above its square root. Have I missed something? What's the logic here?


Answered by Claude Tardif and Penny Nom.
 
Page
1/1

 

 


Math Central is supported by the University of Regina and The Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences.

CMS
.

 

Home Resource Room Home Resource Room Quandaries and Queries Mathematics with a Human Face About Math Central Problem of the Month Math Beyond School Outreach Activities Teacher's Bulletin Board Canadian Mathematical Society University of Regina PIMS