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The product of the page numbers 2003-11-07
From Morgan and Mom:
You open a book and the product of the page numbers is 12,656. What are your page numbers?
Answered by Penny Nom.
Problem solving 2002-04-20
From Kathy:
  1. Zachary wanted to run the shore-to shore marathon next month, a 26 mile race from one side of the island where he lived to the other. He decided to work up to 26 miles by running five days a week for the next five weeks. Each day he'd run one mile longer than he did the day before, except for the first day of the week, when he'd run the same number of miles he ran on the last day of the previous week. He wanted his last two practice runs to be 26 and 27 miles long.

    How many miles would he have to run on his first practice run?

  2. A school just bought a new set of encyclopedias. The front and back covers are 1/8 inch thick, and the pages are 1/100 inch thick (in other words, there are 100 pages per inch). the 26 volume set has a total of 5,250 pages. If you assume there is no extra space left between books, then .........

    What length of bookshelf will the encyclopedias take up?

Answered by Penny Nom.
Numbering pages 2001-11-15
From Lucy:
A printer uses 1008 digits to number the pages of a book. How many pages are there in the book?
Answered by Penny Nom.
Folding a page 2000-03-01
From Krista Bischoff:
One corner of a page of width a is folded over and just reaches the opposite side. Express L, the length of the crease, in terms of x and a.

I can't get the picture to copy to this form so I guess I will have to try and describe the picture the best that I can. The top right hand corner is folded to the left side, almost half way down. The width of the paper is a ( the width of the bottom part which is not folded.) The creased side is L and the part shorter part of the folded area is x (the part that would have been the top right of the original piece.)


Answered by Chris Fisher.
 
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