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intervals

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Sample size 2010-03-29
From Rae:
What sample size was needed to obtain an error range of 2% if the following statement was made? "75% of the workers support the proposed benefit package. These results are considered accurate to within + or - 2%, 18 out of 20 times. This seems like a straight forward question but I'm getting it wrong. Could you please help me out even just the set up would be appreciated so I can see if that's where I'm going wrong. Thanks
Answered by Harley Weston.
The intervals where the function is positive and negative 2010-01-10
From Ron:
Hello

I'm trying to find out the intervals where the function is positive and negative. It's for a polynomial function y= -(x+2)^2 (x-2) and y= (x+1)(x+4)(x-3)

I have tried the right and left side of each x-intercepts, but I still don't understand the results

thank you for your help

Answered by Penny Nom.
Write the interval in absolute value notation 2007-03-20
From Timothy:
1. Write interval in absolute value notation
i) xE[0,9]
ii) xE[-2,20]

Answered by Penny Nom.
A confidence interval 2006-01-21
From Jonathan:

I am attempting to calculate how my confidence interval will widen at the 95% confidence level if my response universe increases from 100 to 150 or to 200.

There is a universe of 54,000. I take a 5% sample for a test universe of 2,700

If my "yes" universe is 100, at the 95% confidence level, what is my +/- range? (i.e +/- 3? +/-5?)

Historically, 6.6% of the 2,700 you say "yes". I am trying to determine how the confidence interval would change if the number of "yes" responders increased to 150 or to 200.


Answered by Penny Nom.
Computing confidence intervals 2004-11-26
From Christie:
I was given a question with N=100, sample proportion is 0.1- compute the 95% confidence interval for P? I have tried this several ways but do not know how to do without means, standard deviations, standard error of the mean? I asked my teacher and she said I have all the info I need. Can you help????
Answered by Penny Nom.
Sampling distributions 2002-02-18
From A student:
  1. given: n = 40, standard deviation is not known, population of individual observations not normal. does the central limit theorem apply in this case? why or why not?

  2. for an estimation problem, list two ways of reducing the magnitude of sampling error?

  3. What will happen to the magnitude of sampling error if the confidence level is raised all other things remaining the same? justify your answer?

Answered by Harley Weston.
Estimating the population mean 1999-11-13
From John Barekman:
Statitistics: Estimating the population mean when the standard deviation is known:

I am not sure which n to use in the formula for the confidence interval equation:

x +/- z*(standard deviation/sqrt(n))

If we have data of ten people, and if we have the data of ten sets of ten people each, what is the difference in the n that we use? What is the difference between the standard deviation and the standard error? Are we using the number of sampling means or just the number of samples?
Answered by Harley Weston.

 
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